02 Blessed to Be a Blessing (09/28/2014)

02 Blessed to Be a Blessing (09/28/2014)

Missions: God’s Heart for the World
Week 02

Blessed to Be a Blessing
Genesis 12:1-9

September 28, 2014

Group Resources

For the Week of September 28, 2014

Abram (later Abraham) serves as the prototypical missionary. God calls him out from one culture to another and from his comfort zone into a world of faith and dependence on God. God promises to bless him, but he has a specific purpose for this blessing which will affect all nations. Read Genesis 12:1-9.

Sermon in a Sentence: “The seeking God is also a sending God, calling, blessing and sending his people so that others across the world can also be blessed with the gospel–Jesus!”


Introduction

  • Looking back at your notes from this week’s sermon, was there anything that particularly caught your attention, challenged or confused you?
  • When has a move or change been particularly difficult for you? What made the move difficult?
  • Think through your own life. What securities would you have the toughest time leaving behind in order to follow God wherever he wanted to direct you in the world?

Read the Text (Genesis 12:1-9)

Abram (later Abraham) serves as the prototypical missionary. God calls him out from one culture to another and from his comfort zone into a world of faith and dependence on God. God promises to bless him, but he has a specific purpose for this blessing which will affect all nations. Read Genesis 12:1-9.

Digging Deeper

  • What commands does the Lord give Abram (12:1)?
  • What promises accompany these commands (12:2-3)?
  • Imagine yourself to be over seventy years old, financially secure with no dependents. Now imagine that God tells you to leave all that security and go to an unknown place. How would you feel?
  • How would you explain the term blessing to someone else—especially someone unfamiliar with biblical language?
  • In Genesis 11:4 God judges and condemns the people who intended to build the tower of Babel in an effort to “make a name” for themselves, yet here God promises to make Abram’s name great (12:2). What is the difference?
  • It seems that God’s call on Abram automatically included Sarai (Sarah), Abram’s wife. How does God’s call on someone affect their closest relations—friends, family, spouse?
  • After the promises and commands, Abram responds. Read Genesis 12:6-9. What characterizes Abram’s action?
  • If we are the “children of Abraham,” what do these verses tell us about why God blesses us?
  • How has God blessed you (consider resources, family, gifts and abilities, training, experiences, and relationships)?
  • What’s a practical step you can take so that God can bless others through you?
  • What action can you take that he might bless other nations through you?

Concluding Thoughts

  • Pause right now and thank God for three or four of the greatest gifts he has given you. Reflect for a few minutes about your greatest fears about the future, then take these fears to God.
  • Psalm 67 starts with a prayer for God’s blessing borrowed from Numbers 6:24-26, but it combines this plea for blessing with an understanding of God’s global purposes in blessing his people. You might read this as a prayer for God to use you as he did Abram.

By |2014-10-06T16:26:30-05:00September 18th, 2014|Teaching Resource, Weekly Resources|0 Comments

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